Saturday, June 20, 2009

Heard Around

by Savannah


More medical expertise from Dr. Monogram's minions. Seems ESPN talking head Darren Cahill thinks the pain is all in Rafael Nadal's head. In this ESPN video clip Cahill says the following:

But I think to me, just a gathering from the press conference here, it seems to be a little more mental than physical and he just knows that he's hit a wall at the moment. And with the knee problems he has he's not getting any better.

So, I think it's quite a lot psychological and not so much physical, to be quite honest.


Keep it coming dudes. I mean your man said he had mono and to date no one has questioned his declaration even though he seems to be fitter than the Energizer Bunny and is not suffering relapses the way Mario Ancic has been for awhile now. I find it ironic that The Monogram's pronouncements are treated as if they come from Mount Olympus while everyone else's, especial Rafael's, are treated as fodder for inane and dare I say slanderous ruminations by everyone in the tennis press. It's been obvious for some time that Rafa's movement hasn't been right. In the match against Soderling it was painfully obvious to anyone who cared to look. Instead of talking about Rafa's lack of movement the press, especially here in the States, focused on Robin Soderling's "great" game. This while the Monogram went through a field that even I wouldn't have had too much trouble overcoming.

It occurred to me yesterday that maybe all this medical expertise is being bandied about because the Monogram knows in his heart of hearts that he only wins majors when Rafa is not there to challenge him. While his fans and sycophants rail that no asterisk should be placed next to his name he knows that if he had to face the one man who has not fallen under his spell he wouldn't be able to overcome.

Is it "psychological" when you have to think about how to move without pain or a normal human reaction to pain and discomfort Darren? Is it wrong for Rafa to try and be a man of his word and honor his commitments? It's not an easy thing for Rafael to walk away from a tennis tournament. He had to see for himself that he was not doing himself any favors by trying to play Wimbledon, the major that means so much to him. Let's hope he listens to his family and rests awhile before picking up a racquet again.

16 comments:

Helen W said...

It just never ends, does it?

None of these self-styled medical experts had a word to say about Federer's mono or his back injruy, but they come out of the woodwork to pronounce on Rafa's knees. Never mind that anyone with half a clue could see that his movement has not been what it was during the entire clay court season.

And Dr. Monogram could not resist piling on as well.

How ugly they all are.

anonymous said...

Drs Federer and Cahill will pay when karma comes back around. OK as a rafa fan now I hope Dokovic beats Murray in finals(the hype from brit media has been a bit too much. Those $%@##@*asked rafa whether Murray was the fave now that he has withdrawn!)....

IF Novak could somehow beat Fed the AWESOMENESS of it all will make me explode in happiness. Did you know Novak talked to Rafa with their common PR person Benito for a LONG time? The only thing that will rescue this tourney would be a Novak surprise win.

Shannon said...

The most ironic thing about it is that the people who are saying it might be more psychological than physical are the very same people who will watch him playing brilliantly and tell us, in ominous voices, how they just don't know how his body can hold up for much longer.

Savannah said...

My great grandmother was British so go Murray!!!

BooksHere said...

Rafa's withdrawal allows Federer the opportunity to say what he has wanted to say: "So that we can’t potentially maybe repeat that is obviously sad. But it gives me it just shows me how lucky I’ve been, you know, that I haven’t been injured over all those years, you know, that I’ve been able to keep it up.

Even though I was No. 1, the one people were going after, I was there, I was not injured very often, and I was able to keep it up. It just shows it goes so quick.

So it’s unfortunate. I’m sad for him, because it must have been a very difficult decision to make." (Wimbledon - interview)

I think Federer's arrogance is offensive not only because it is distasteful to see an adult brag, but because he is both so complacently stupid (and I mean stupid in English, not Spanish, in which the word has a slightly different connotation) and cunnignly self-serving. I always think, would any other player say such a thing about a rival? How does the sports media (not all that clever themselves, with few exceptions) not laugh out loud when Federer says these things?

I do think Federer is a brilliant player, but Rafa is no less brilliant and no less adored by fans, but yet Rafa is NEVER complacent, NEVER mean-spirited in in self-celebration. So, all in all, when it comes down to taking the measure of these two great champions, Nadal will, in my opinion, be known in the end as the greater man; the greater sportsman; the finer example. Federer will be nowhere close.

Savannah said...

BooksHere welcome to this space and thank you for your brilliant post.
--------------------
I think Federer's arrogance is offensive not only because it is distasteful to see an adult brag, but because he is both so complacently stupid (and I mean stupid in English, not Spanish, in which the word has a slightly different connotation) and cunnignly self-serving. I always think, would any other player say such a thing about a rival? How does the sports media (not all that clever themselves, with few exceptions) not laugh out loud when Federer says these things?
-----------------------
Cunningly self serving is the best description I've read about the Monogram. Doesn't anyone find it interesting that he says he's never been hurt yet said he had a back injury? I won't even go into the mono nonsense. I have two words for that - Mario Ancic.

That the tennis press lets him get away with his statements is amazing, Notice the non coverage of the "he's not in pain" statement and the wide distribution of his more conciliatory sounding Wimbledon interview. Reading, and listening, is fundamental.

Craig Hickman said...

Cunningly self-serving. Interesting.

Though I must say I don't think he's cunning at all. Roger Federer is a Transparent Narcissist.

Certified.

Craig Hickman said...

I take that back. He IS cunning. But he's also transparent. He can be both.

Certified.

BooksHere said...

Thanks, Savannah. This is a wonderful blog. You know what else Federer said? This in response to being asked what he and Tiger have in common: "Success, I guess. I mean, I don’t know what else to say. I mean, like we’ve been at the top for a very long time. We’ve been when you talk about golf, you talk about Tiger; when you talk about tennis, you talk about me."

Wasn't it Helen W. who once said on this blog or Craig's that Federer "never fails to nauseate"? But not one reporter in the crowd had the nerve or the common sense to point out that, despite the same number of major championship titles bet. the two men, there is a big difference: F. has a RIVAL who beats him more often than not. Federer is no longer alone at the top, as Tiger is. But no one said a thing about that. No one; not a one. Shame.

oddman said...

OMG!!!??? Did he really say that? When you talk about tennis, you talk about me?

Certified.

Savannah said...

He did. And no one finds anything wrong with what he said. Except for those of us whose eyes are open and are therefore able to see.

What I don't understand is the need for The Monogram's fans to try and beat all who disagree with them into submission. It's as if things like the facts about his draws, his alleged illnesses and back problems, his sitting out for long periods of time while other players honor their commitments to the tour vex them.

I think he is cunningly self serving Craig. He gets away with it because he's allowed to by everyone around him. Sad.

Helen W said...

BooksHere says:

So, all in all, when it comes down to taking the measure of these two great champions, Nadal will, in my opinion, be known in the end as the greater man; the greater sportsman; the finer example. Federer will be nowhere close.

Beautifully expressed! Thank you.

Mr. Monogram has never met a microphone he didn't fall instantly in love with, but his over-weaning self-absorbtion ensures that he is unable to prevent blunder after revealing blunder when he addresses it. His character is there for all to see, and has been for years. But as they say .... There are none so blind as those that would not see ....

Fred66 said...

Savannah, come on, I know Federer can be smug and self-possessed, and it's pretty obvious you have no love for the guy, but even you have to admit he did NOT have an easy time at Roland Garros. He was close to losing to Tommy Haas; del Potro took him to five sets. O.K. you can't stand The Monogram, but give credit where credit is due.
To be honest, I was much more offended by Sharapova's seeding at Wimbledon than by Federer's supposedly mean-spirited remarks. It amazes me that there hasn't been more critisicm of that little tidbit.

Savannah said...

Hi Fred66.

Any true fan of tennis would be outraged at the Sharapova seeding.

As for Roger's words they speak for themselves.

sG said...

God love ya, Savannah.

sG said...

I do agree with Fred66 on this point: Fed did not have an easy time of it on his side of the draw at RG until Monfils. However, there is nothing 'supposed' about his recent arrogant statements regarding Rafa.

While Federer was having his troubles never once did you hear or read anything about Rafa taking verbal side-swipes at him. He defended him more often than not when he had ample opportunity to throw him under the bus. Roger's "he's not in pain" comments were low and uncalled for; I tried to find the unoffensive side to it but it doesn't exist. His Wimbledon comments are not much better.